Back to Parking Impr. District/TIF Parking Committee July 2006 Recommendations.
Parking
General page.

Materials from Irene Sherr, Community Counsel for the 53rd TIF Parking Committee, December 2006:

Parking Improvement Districts- A Tool for Change (short fact sheet). By Irene Sherr, Community Counsel for the 53rd TIF Parking Committee, December 2006.
A PID Survey: What Would 53rd Street Need to Succeed? How would you use income from a PID?

PID Implementation Strategies suggested by Metropolitan Planning Council. Note this page's caution at start of that section.

DRAFT/SAMPLE of A PID Survey: What Would 53rd Street Need to Succeed, What would you do with income from a PID?* Hopes are to make the final electronically available to fill in once it has been approved.

WHAT DOES 53RD STREET NEED TO SUCCEED?

WHAT DOES 53RD STREET NEED TO SUCCEED?

Please circle the number that indicates the importance you place on implementing the following programs.
1 is the least important and 5 is the most.
Program or Service
Scale of Importance
Not at all Not very No Opinion Some-what Extremely
Maintenance and Beautification. Includes sidewalk sweeping, sidewalk snow removal, landscape plantings and maintenance, street furniture and crosswalk maintenance
1
2
3
4
5
Streetscape Improvements.
Includes light infrastructure projects like acorn lighting, street furniture, banners, kiosks, gateway features, etc.
1
2
3
4
5
Marketing, Informing and Promoting. Includes advertising and promotion programs and materials, special events, branding programs, district outreach.
1
2
3
4
5
Business retention and recruitment. Includes technical assistance to businesses, vacancy database management, market analysis tenant recruitment initiatives and materials.
1
2
3
4
5
Parking and Accessibility.
Includes transit and parking studies, public parking facility maintenance & management, parking wayfinding and signage, shuttle programs, pedestrian accessibility, etc.
1
2
3
4
5
Safety Programs and Services. Includes surveillance cameras, supplemental police equipment such as pagers or bicycles, promotion of CAPS.
1
2
3
4
5
Storefront Improvements. Includes design assistance and storefront façade improvement financing through a matching or rebate-type program. Improvements governed by design guidelines of district.
1
2
3
4
5
Community and Economic Development.
Includes innovative programs for community & economic development to address problems like unemployment, homelessness, etc.)
1
2
3
4
5
Add your own suggestion
1
2
3
4
5
Add your own suggestion
1
2
3
4
5

*Ed.: Not (yet?) included is a suggestion for a trolley or other alternative transportation linking disabled and seniors to shopping and perhaps other venues.

Concept policy draft from the Metropolitan Planning Council to the 53rd TIF Parking Committee. [Note that applicability to the Hyde Park central business district varies from one goal or parameter or criterion to another; several have not been yet evaluated by the local committee for suitability to Hyde Park needs or for a match pointing to advisability of a local PID by the Parking Committee or others in the community.- Gary Ossewaarde]

Transportation Improvement Districts
Implementation Strategies

September 28, 2006

1. What are the goals of Transportation Improvement Districts (TIDs)?

Suggestion: To bring more people into stores to boost local sales and improve the vitality of commercial districts without overwhelming the district with additional car traffic. This means promoting the character of place and increasing the number of people accessing the area by means other than private cars.

Shared goals from other perspectives include:

· For district as a whole: Create a virtuous cycle – Increase revenue from existing parking supply; use that revenue to enhance shopping environment as well as create better infrastructure to draw more customers on foot, transit, cabs, and bicycles; boost sales revenue in district; attract more retail development; attract more people; invest in infrastructure; etc.

· For urban planning: Establish desirability of dense, transit-, walking-, bicycling-, and cab-oriented retail by showing purchasing power of these districts; attracting good retail; creating demand for more transit-oriented dense development; attracting more people to move to and stay in the city; boosting city economy.

· For transportation and access: Provide a new tool to assist with traffic management to deter undesirable levels of driving and provide revenues to target toward making alternatives to the private automobile truly competitive.

· For public revenue: Increase sales tax revenue by allowing local groups to invest in the infrastructure that will attract more customers. Over the long term, an improved commercial district may attract additional residential development or appreciate the value of surrounding private properties, which may bring the city more income tax and property tax in addition to the sales tax.

2. What criteria should be used to choose locations to implement TIDs?

Suggestion: TIDs should be used pro-actively to shape development, not reactively as a tool to manage a perceived parking problem. At this point, the Department of Planning and Development should pick low hanging fruit and market their success to other areas of the city. The district should have:
· Existing successful mixture of entertainment and retail (24-7 destinations)
· Existing Special Service Area or Chamber of Commerce.
· Existing L or commuter rail stop (buses probably not sufficient).
· High levels of pedestrian traffic.
· Existing parking crunch, with little to no room for development of parking garages.
· Existing clientele who are able and willing to pay for parking or cabs or live in the denser parts of Chicago that make transit easy and appealing.
· Existing cab usage (bulk of clientele drawn from area that is a maximum $15-20 cab ride away).
· Existing local organization with the technical capacity and active desire to create, operate, and manage a local program.

3. What parameters, if any, should exist for how local partners spend the revenue generated by TIDs?

Suggestion: To ensure the success of the Transportation Improvement District, there should be certain limits and requirements on the use of TID funds, for example:
· Limit use of revenue for building more parking structures; this should not be a starting goal.
· Limit private development of parking structures in area.
· Installation of taxi stand(s).
· Installation of signs guiding people to transit options and cab stand(s).
· Installation of bicycle improvements (racks, signage, valet service etc.)
· Must make sure residential areas and other edges of the TID area protected from parking scofflaws (residential parking permits, increased enforcement, etc).
· Other transportation and access related improvements apart from general marketing of retail area.

4. What criteria should be used to evaluate the success or failure of a TID?

Suggestion: The TID should be judged by indicators:
· Did shops in the TID see an increase in sales compared to past trends within a designated period of time?
· Did more people visit the area within a designated period of time?
· Did the relative percentage of car traffic decrease compared to foot, transit, bicycle, and cab traffic?
· No increase in parking violations on streets within a half-mile radius surrounding the district.
· Opinion surveys of shoppers about the attractiveness of the district.